.Rambling MONSTER.

ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8
ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom
Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).
No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.
- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8

ratak-monodosico:

People of the Twenty-First Century, Hans Eijkelboom

Over the course of the last 20 years, Dutch conceptual artist and street photographer Hans Eijkelboom documented fashion trends worn by people in New York, Paris, Amsterdam and Shanghai. The images, laid out into grids, are compiled into one comprehensive book, Hans Eijkelboom: People of the Twenty-First Century (Phaidon Press, 2014).

No other photo book gives you so many fur coats, plaid shirts, pink tank tops and jean suits. Eijkelboom’s process involved scouting busy pedestrian areas, sometimes spending a half hour, or even a few hours waiting, observing passerby and paying careful attention to repeating garments. Using a trigger in his pocket, he snapped the photos from a camera hung around his neck.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/09/28668#gallery-8


hirxeth:

“i’d die for her. i love her so much. i don’t know what i would do without her. she’s going through a lot right now. i wish i could just kiss away the pain, make it go away, stop it, kill it! if she, you know, (gets teary eyed) i don’t know what i would do. i’d kill myself. i love that girl. i love her. i love her almost more than i love myself” - Johnny Depp on Winona Ryder (1989)
hirxeth:

“i’d die for her. i love her so much. i don’t know what i would do without her. she’s going through a lot right now. i wish i could just kiss away the pain, make it go away, stop it, kill it! if she, you know, (gets teary eyed) i don’t know what i would do. i’d kill myself. i love that girl. i love her. i love her almost more than i love myself” - Johnny Depp on Winona Ryder (1989)

hirxeth:

“i’d die for her. i love her so much. i don’t know what i would do without her. she’s going through a lot right now. i wish i could just kiss away the pain, make it go away, stop it, kill it! if she, you know, (gets teary eyed) i don’t know what i would do. i’d kill myself. i love that girl. i love her. i love her almost more than i love myself” - Johnny Depp on Winona Ryder (1989)


newmuseum:

Five years ago today, New Museum celebrated the opening day of “Museum as a Hub: Six Degrees.” “Six Degrees” referred to the angle Bowery Street made and still makes today off of NYC’s grid–a way of considering the uniqueness of downtown and the vibrant community of cultural producers that has historically marked the Bowery and Lower East Side. The exhibition engaged the neighborhood by employing nearby building as canvases, local artists as collaborators, and New Museum territory as a meeting place, recital hall, and lab.
Pictured here is Lisa Sigal’s Line-up, a line of the same color of the green bicycle lanes around the city continues from looking out of the window in the Resource Center into the horizon and beyond, a metaphor for the effects of the New Museum on its new neighborhood (the line still exists today!). Also pictured here is the hub for Nigh School, a seminar series organized by Anton Vidokle on the occasion of “Six Degrees.”
Click here to learn more about the exhibition.
newmuseum:

Five years ago today, New Museum celebrated the opening day of “Museum as a Hub: Six Degrees.” “Six Degrees” referred to the angle Bowery Street made and still makes today off of NYC’s grid–a way of considering the uniqueness of downtown and the vibrant community of cultural producers that has historically marked the Bowery and Lower East Side. The exhibition engaged the neighborhood by employing nearby building as canvases, local artists as collaborators, and New Museum territory as a meeting place, recital hall, and lab.
Pictured here is Lisa Sigal’s Line-up, a line of the same color of the green bicycle lanes around the city continues from looking out of the window in the Resource Center into the horizon and beyond, a metaphor for the effects of the New Museum on its new neighborhood (the line still exists today!). Also pictured here is the hub for Nigh School, a seminar series organized by Anton Vidokle on the occasion of “Six Degrees.”
Click here to learn more about the exhibition.

newmuseum:

Five years ago today, New Museum celebrated the opening day of “Museum as a Hub: Six Degrees.” “Six Degrees” referred to the angle Bowery Street made and still makes today off of NYC’s grid–a way of considering the uniqueness of downtown and the vibrant community of cultural producers that has historically marked the Bowery and Lower East Side. The exhibition engaged the neighborhood by employing nearby building as canvases, local artists as collaborators, and New Museum territory as a meeting place, recital hall, and lab.

Pictured here is Lisa Sigal’s Line-up, a line of the same color of the green bicycle lanes around the city continues from looking out of the window in the Resource Center into the horizon and beyond, a metaphor for the effects of the New Museum on its new neighborhood (the line still exists today!). Also pictured here is the hub for Nigh School, a seminar series organized by Anton Vidokle on the occasion of “Six Degrees.”

Click here to learn more about the exhibition.